The lovely ugliness

Pointing out differences may be an act of understanding and accepting each other. Respecting other people’s being is something hardly achievable by an ordinary, phallic man. Although it is being talked about a lot it is hardly applicable.

Somehow, the first thing people notice on an individual is their flaws. It is alright being aware of it, but it should be put aside, since it is not what someone IS.

Last night I read a post written by a famous pole dancer. She wrote about people noticing her flaws during some early age and later on, after years and years of wearing longer shirts because of her broad ties and big but and serious faces because of her teeth gap, the same people were asking her how did she manage to have so attractive figure and why doesn’t she smile a bit more, since she has that cute, little gap (which she made smaller at some point of her life when it became so irritating; she never absolutely closed it because she wanted to keep her identity as much as it wouldn’t press her).

Why is beauty such an inconstant phenomenon?

There’s no man or woman on Earth who didn’t experience that unpleasant situation of other people pointing at their hair, figure, scars, height, weight, outfit, looks, scars in such an intrusive manner.

It is easier to say for someone fatty that they’re fat, no matter if they play a cello or speak five languages. It’s easier to criticize than to give a compliment.

Noticing flaws gives us fake hope that we’re better than someone else, that we’re winning an unfair competition which we made up by ourselves. People appreciate what is outside, more than they think.

Talking about big butts, those were unacceptable during the Twiggy era, and later on. It was preferable to be thin. After the freak show Kardashians arrived, suddenly it became popular to have enormously broad figure. Nobody asked a question. What was ugly before suddenly became highly attractive. And not to mention that a group of some truly non-essential, rather say rude people had to present it as they did and others to accept it – as they did.

Degrading our powerful and beautiful bodies in such way makes me angry. It is not just a body. It can do lots of stuff for us and our minds. It can stand high pressures, it can bend, it can lift, it can protect our inner self; it’s not a toy and surly it is not made for showing off or even worse, for offending.

Worse than an ugly body is an ugly soul.

It is beautiful, but it is not just that. That body keeps yourself in it. It represents you. Sometimes you do take care of it, but it just won’t look as you imagined. It is still beautiful. The one who sees you, sees them both equally – your inside and your outside.

 

 

 

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